Resources: Print and Online

Print Resources

The easiest (and most fun) way to promote literacy in your household is to spend as much quality time with your child as possible. The resources below give tips on ways to have fun and meaningful interaction with your children. Each resource can be found through the Beloit Public Library.



150+ Screen-Free Activities for Kids by Asia Citro

Summary: I absolutely love this text. It has tons of activities to do at home with your children. There are instructions on how to create a variety of play dough and paints. It also has ideas for "small worlds", which are mini creations that help children's imaginations flourish. The book ends with options for creating homemade toys and sensory activities. Each activity gives a recommended age level (anything from baby, toddler, preschooler, and ages 5 and up) and explains if it is dye, dairy, nut, egg, or soy free.

Citro, A. (2014). 150+ Screen-free activities for kids. Avon, MA: Adams Media.

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Talking on the Go by Dorothy P. Dougherty and Diane R. Paul

Summary: I really enjoyed skimming the ideas in this manual. There are dozens of ideas to cultivate vocabulary, reading, and writing with your child whether you're at home, outside, on the road, or at the supermarket. The book gives suggestions for parents of younger children (the guide has ideas for children five and under) but many ideas can also be tweaked slightly for older children. A few ideas they give are listed below.

Home: Rhyme as much as possible. When you do the dishes, say "dish, wish, fish. . ." or when you pick up a teddy bear say, "bear, hair, fair, care. . . ".

Outside: Talk about the weather, different temperature, and activities you can do in different types of weather.

On the Road: Be on the lookout for letters on the sides of signs or trucks. Sound out the letters and think of other words that begin with the same letter.

At the Supermarket: Encourage your child to use words that detail food (i.e. round melons, orange carrots, etc.).

Dougherty, D. & Paul D. (2007). Talking on the go. Rockville, MD: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.

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Online Resources

Storyline Online: This site, created by the Screen Actors Guild, has dozens of books read by actor's and their families. These fun reads allow students to read along with the famous actor as they share a favorite story. There are also extension activities students can complete after each reading.

International Children's Digital Library: Hundreds of books from around the world, focusing on various cultures, are available for free through this site. While there is not an option for the books to be read to students, it is a great site for children to practice read-to-self strategies. 

As I go through books, I am starting to create a list by level. All the books on the below lists are available through the Beloit Public Library. If they do not have a copy available, please inquire at the children's desk and they will help you place a hold on the books you're interested in. 

**Check back often as I will be updating the list as new books become available.**





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